Tube Types

By October 19, 2017Newsletter

In the tube feeding community, many people often refer to their MIC-KEY* “button” (or simply “tube”) when asking questions and joining conversations. While it’s wonderful that we have the ability to chat with others who understand us without having to dive into deep explanations, it’s important to note that these terms can mean different things to different people. To help you or anyone in your life who may benefit from an overview, the guide included below describes the enteral feeding tubes that we make and how they work.

Did you know that we primarily make two types of enteral feeding tubes? Our MIC-KEY* Feeding Tubes are those that are low-profile, sitting at skin level. Our MIC* Feeding Tubes are those that have the longer tubing that hangs loose outside of the stomach.

The MIC-KEY* and MIC* Gastrostomy Feeding Tubes

The MIC-KEY* and MIC* Gastrostomy Feeding Tubes are used to provide a means of accessing the stomach to provide nourishment, liquids and medication. They may also be used to release excess air or contents from the stomach. These feeding tubes are made of silicone and are kept in place by an internal balloon to prevent the tube from falling out of the stomach. The MIC-KEY* G tube has a fixed external base (or bolster) that keeps the tube from migrating into the stomach. The MIC* G tube has a SECUR-LOK* external retention ring or bolster that keeps the tube from migrating into the stomach. If you have a MIC-KEY* G tube, the administration of feeding or medications is facilitated by the use of an extension set that connects to the feeding tube and to the feeding set (or an enteral syringe).

The MIC* PEG Feeding Tube

Similar to the MIC* Gastrostomy (G) Feeding Tube, the MIC* PEG Feeding Tube is used to provide a means of accessing the stomach to provide nourishment, liquids and medication. It may also be used to release excess air or contents from the stomach. This type of feeding tube is made of silicone and is kept in place by an internal bumper, as opposed to a balloon, that keeps the tube from falling out of the stomach. It has a SECUR-LOK* external retention ring or bolster that keeps the tube from migrating into the stomach.

The MIC-KEY* and MIC* Gastric-Jejunal Feeding Tubes

Our MIC-KEY* and MIC* Gastric-Jejunal (GJ) Feeding Tubes are used to provide a means of accessing the stomach and jejunum to provide nourishment, liquids, medication and decompression. Decompression is the process of releasing excess air or contents from the stomach. These tubes extend through the stomach and into the jejunum for feeding into the small intestine. They are made of silicone and are kept in place by an internal balloon that keeps the tube from falling out of the stomach. The MIC* GJ Feeding Tube also has a SECUR-LOK* external retention ring or bolster that keeps the tube from migrating into the stomach, while the MIC-KEY* GJ Feeding Tube has a fixed external base or bolster that keeps the tube from migrating into the stomach. If you have a MIC-KEY* GJ Feeding Tube, the administration of feeding or medications is facilitated by the use of extension sets that connect to the feeding tube and to the feeding set (or enteral syringe).

MIC-KEY* Low Profile and MIC* Jejunal Feeding Tubes

The MIC-KEY* and MIC* Jejunal Feeding Tubes are used to provide access to the jejunum (the small bowel) to provide nourishment, liquids and medication.These types of feeding tubes extend through the stomach and into the jejunum for feeding into the small intestine. They are made of silicone and kept in place by an internal balloon that keeps the tube from falling out of the stomach. Like the others, our MIC* J tubes have a SECUR-LOK* external retention ring or bolster that keeps the tube from migrating into the stomach. Our MIC-KEY* J tubes have a fixed external base or bolster that keeps the tube from migrating into the stomach. And again, if you have a MIC-KEY* J tube, the administration of feeding or medications is facilitated by the use of extension sets that connect to the feeding tube and to the feeding set (on enteral syringe).

In addition to the tube types listed here, we recently acquired CORPAK MedSystems and their NG (Nasogastric) and NI (Nasointestinal) feeding tubes. Unlike the items previously discussed, these feeding tubes are placed through the nose as opposed to the abdominal wall.

What kind of feeding tube do you or your loved one currently have? Have you always had this type of tube or have you had others? Share with us on Facebook!